Revelations guide manglossary to live
according to the Divine Lawglossary
through relating  his activities on earth
to his ultimate goal(s) of existence,
and to face earthly challenges

The Egyptian Society for Spiritual and Cultural Research

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Living According 
to The Divine Law
in The Ancient Egyptians Beliefs

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The Ancient Egyptians’ approach to life was not theorized, rather, it was lived and expressed through their work, and what they had left for coming generations. They were able to overcome layers of earthly illusions by opening themselves to the natural world and beyond. Their thorough observation and interaction with  nature led them to build their knowledge and beliefs without contradiction. Plowing, sowing, and reaping were viewed as an earthly symbol for a divine activity.

It is important to realize that for Egyptians, every physical fact of life had a symbolic act of expression. At the same time, every symbolic act of expression had a material background. (Gadalla 1997:21)


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The Egyptians did not differentiate between mundane and sacred domains; they were mixing them together in an interesting way. Because the life hereafter was the core of their life on earth, they were considering all their activities as means for cultivation for the afterlife. By focusing on the after world, they learnt much about the nature of this world.

The Egyptians were aware of the evil side within man's heart, which may reflect on his behavior. The evil side within aims at dispersing the self. Man's role is to resist this defusing power. When man is in peace from within, he will spread peace around. If man succeeds to live in harmony with his original pure nature, his behavior will describe this stage of oneness. He cannot harm any one or any creature.


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The 42 negative statements of confession that are mentioned in the Book of the Coming Forth by Day (known as the Book of the Dead) express what is expected from man in order to be saved in the afterlife. Among those statements, we read the following:
  • I have not uttered evil words
  • I have not caused pain
  • I have not caused shedding of tears
  • I have not caused terror
  • I have not worked grief
  • I have not acted with insolence
  • I have not done either harm or ill
  • I have not spoken scornfully.

Self-denial, service and teamwork were highly valued in the Egyptian civilization. The process of building the Pyramids, for example, reflects those values.